Massachusetts man has miracle recovery after car accident

A Massachusetts man is fortunate to be alive after his vehicle hydroplaned on the Massachusetts Turnpike and crashed into a jersey barrier while moving at a high rate of speed.

In the wake of the car accident, which doctors say, should have claimed his life, the 34-year-old has learned to walk and talk once again, and serves as a motivational speaker to others. The man, who speaks to people who have medical challenges, students and businesses, attributes his medical miracle to the power of positive thinking.

The 2009 car accident left the man with injuries to both the left and right sides of his body. He lost his left ear and the left side of his face was ripped open. He severely tore his right arm. He had multiple fractures and nerve damage. His injuries were so severe that physicians placed him into a medically induced coma for almost a week to try to save the man.

Over the next two and a half years, the man had 13 surgeries and multiple skin grafts. His right hand needed to be sown to his abdomen to receive one of the grafts. Some of these risky treatments were only performed because of the man’s positive attitude and determination to heal.

The man also credits the Good Samaritan who initially administered first aid to him after the accident, the head trauma unit of the University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, a surgeon who dedicated himself to helping the man through complex medical procedures and his insurance company for his survival. He also received incredible support from his friends and family, including his parents, who provided home care to him after his surgeries, and his girlfriend, who he has since married.

While most people would have been overcome with negative emotions after going through all this, the Massachusetts man became inspired to share his story and started a motivational speaking circuit and a website, www.mookiesmiracle.com.

Source: Portland Press Herald, “Mass. medical miracle shares his inspirational story,” Susan Spencer, Sept. 21, 2012